DORMIENS VIGILA

Alberto Magno y el Laboratorio del Renacimiento

Atalanta Fugiens

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

After spending the best part of my life in the study of the liberal arts and sciences, and in the company of wise men and judicious scholars, I was compelled, as the result of my observation of mankind, to arrive at the melancholy conclusion that the hearts of most persons are set either on ambitious and vainglorious projects, on sensual pleasures, or on the accumulation of wealth by all and any means; and that few care either for God or for virtue. At first I did not quite know whether to become a disciple of the laughing or of the weeping philosopher, or whether to join in the exclamation of the wise Prince of Israel: “All things are vanity.” But at length the Bible and experience taught me to take refuge in the study of the hidden secrets of Nature, whether pursued at home, by means of books or abroad, in the Great Volume of the World. Now, the more I drank of the mighty fount of knowledge, the more painfully my thirst, like that of Tantalus, seemed to increase. I had heard that there was a bird called Phoenix, the only one of its kind in the whole world, whose feathers and flesh constitute the great and glorious medicine for all passion, pain, and sorrow; which also Helena, after her return from Troy, had presented in the form of a draught to Telemachus, who thereupon had forgotten all his sorrows and troubles. This bird I could not indeed hope to obtain entire, but I was seized with an irresistible longing to become possessed of at least one of its smallest feathers; and for this unspeakable privilege I was prepared to spend all my substance, to travel far and wide, and to endure every hardship. There was, of course, much to discourage me. Some people denied the very existence of this bird; others laughed at my faith in its wonder-working properties. I was thus brought for a time to regard all that Tacitus, Pliny, and all other writers have said as fabulous, and to doubt whether, after all, the different narcotics and opiates were not a better remedy for anger and sorrow than the supposed virtues of the Phoenix. Moreover, I had heard of the simple method of curing these mental ailments suggested by a certain wise man to Augustus, whom he bade run through the twenty-four letters before saying anything whenever he was angry; and this suggestion appeared to supersede all other remedies. I had also read the books of those moral philosophers who undertake to prescribe an effective remedy for every disease of the mind. But after giving all these boasted specifics a fair trial, I found, to my dismay, that they were of little practical use. In many cases, the causes of mental maladies appeared to be material, and to consist in an excess or defect of the bile, or of some other bodily substance; in all these cases a medical treatment seemed to be indicated; whence Galen, that prince among physicians, was led to believe that character depends on temperaments of the body.
As a soldier may lose all his bravery and strength by being starved and confined in a close prison, so even a good person may yield to anger, simply through some vicious habit of body. This opinion is most reasonable in itself, and is borne out, amongst other things, by the testimony which is given by Arnold of Villanova, in that book of his where he sets forth the virtues of all medicines by means of tables of the four qualities: “The medicines that conduce to intellectual excellence are those which strengthen the digestion, and nourish the brain and the principal vitals, purging out all superfluities, purifying the blood. and preventing the ascent of vapours to the brain; hence you will find that many medical writers speak of their medicines as productive of a direct effect upon the mind, when it is only through the medium of the stomach, the brain, the blood, the liver, etc., that they tend to brighten the intellectual faculties, by improving the general health of the brain, and quickening all processes of the body, that you may say they are productive of joy, because they tend to strengthen the chief limbs, purify the blood, and produce good animal spirits. Other medicines “lead to Paradise,” as they dispose the heart to charity and to every good work. by their action upon the blood. Some medicinal herbs have the power of exciting love, by increasing and clarifying the blood, and thus quickening the sexual instinct; while others make men chaste and religious, by inducing poverty and frigidity of blood, and taking away the edge of all sensual appetite. In the same way, it is possible, by means of certain drugs, to make men stupid and insane, as men are rendered dull and stolid by drinking, too much wine. You may also notice, sometimes, that after eating a certain kind of food, men become light-hearted, joyous, and inclined to dance and sing- though they are ordinarily staid and grave persons — while other kinds of food have a contrary effect upon them. Thus, a physician has power to make a miser liberal, a chaste person lascivious, a timid person bold, simply by changing the complexion of his vital juices. Such are the wonderful secrets of the medical Art, though of course, they are hidden from the foolish and the ignorant. There are a great many infatuated persons who will not believe that medicine can do anything but cure a headache; but such people know little of the resources of this science. Hippocrates forbad the physicians whom he taught to reveal these secrets; and it was a wise prohibition.” A little further on the same writer says: ” What medicine can produce greater heat than anger? or chill the body more than fear? or invigorate the nerves more thoroughly than joy? or nourish and comfort more gently than hope? And what more certain cause of death is there than despair?” These are the words of the philosopher, and they shew that medicine may, through the body, cure the mind, and thus supply a remedy for anger as well as other mental disturbances. It is true that if there is a remedy for anger, it would, in the present state of the world, hardly be very highly esteemed. Still it would calm the passions of individuals, although other persons might not recognise its value. But that which men do. not care to have just now, may one day be in great demand. Such is the vicissitude of all things human. Galen once said that the savages of England and Germany were as hostile to the science of Medicine as they were ignorant of it. But now the descendants of Galen’s countrymen are sunk in barbarism, while the English and Germans are the most skilful physicians in the world. Thus it seems very likely that this Remedy may be one day in great request, especially when we consider its vast utility, and the innumerable evils which anger brings upon men.

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Cuadratura del Circulo

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Cuadratura del Circulo

Atalanta Fugiens

Michael Maier’s book Atalanta Fugiens (Atalanta Fleeing) was published at Oppenheim in 1617 by the firm of Johann Theodor de Bry. It’s an alchemical text in a strikingly unusual form: it comprises fifty sections, where each section consists of a score of a short fugue (‘in two canonical parts over a cantus firmus’), a motto, an engraved emblematic image, a Latin verse, and a few pages of cryptic commentary. It takes its title from the legendary tale of Atalanta’s race with Hippomenes. In its simultaneous presentation of music, image, poetry and prose, it is a singular piece of Baroque multimedia. A few of the books’s emblems (engraved either by de Bry himself, or by his son-in-law, Matthäus Merian), follow below.

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Dormiens Vigila

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Dormiens Vigila

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Gemelo Magno

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

perfil

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Leyes de la Estatua

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Leyes de la Pata fisica

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¡Es la sabiduría estúpido!

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Otro?
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Patafísica descalza

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Patafsica Magna

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¿Un Bobo en Bogotá?

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Big AL
This sculpture is located in front of the O’Quinn Law Library at the University of Houston. He is located atop a set of stairs that lead down into the entrance of the library. This is the third of three castings of this sculpture by Gerhard Marcks, who was a German sculptor born in 1889 and died in 1981. Another Gerhard Marcks sculpture on the University of Houston is Orpheus.

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¿Un Bobo en Colonia?

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

El Bobo en Colonia?

¿Y éste otro hermano frente a la
Albertus Magnus Professur der Universität zu Köln
tambien salió Bobo?

http://www.amp.uni-koeln.de/

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¿El Bobo en Houston?

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

Un Bobo en Houston?

Y éste Alberto al que llaman Big AL, tan vaciado a su hermano uniandino y que se encuentra frente al University of Houston Law Center, tambien salió Bobo?

Esto dice la ficha del centro de leyes de la Universidad de Houston:

“Albertus Magnus” or Albert the Great is the name of the imposing bronze statue situated in the courtyard of the University of Houston Law Center.

Albert the Great was a medieval theologian and “Man of Universal Knowledge.” Born in Lauingen, Bavaria sometime between 1193 and 1206, he was a bishop, doctor and saint of the Roman Catholic Church, having as one of his students Saint Thomas Aquinas. He taught in Paris and at the Studium Generale in Cologne, a university run by the Order of the Dominicans in the 13th century and one of the first universities in Europe. A dominant figure, he was an influential teacher, an experienced traveler, a keen observer of life and nature and the one learned man of the Golden Age to be called “the Great.” He was later declared a saint by the catholic church.

Albertus Magnus is the best-known work of German sculptor Gerhard Marcks (1889 – 1981)and considered to be his finest by many scholars and artists. The UH acquisition was made from a special cast in Dusseldorf by permission of Marcks and his family. An identical casting was placed in 1955 in front of the Albertus-Magnus-University of Cologne, Germany. The third casting is at the University of Bogotá.

With his open law book and profound expression, Big Al, as he is informally called, is the bigger than life symbol of the legal profession to Law Center students and faculty.

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Saeculum tertium decimum

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

SIGLO XIII
Saxo Grammaticus (ca. 1150 – ca. 1220)
Gervasius Tilleberiensis (ca. 1160 – 1234/1235)
Gregorius IX (ca. 1160 – 1241)
Boncompagno da Signa (ca. 1170 – ca. 1240)
Robertus Grosseteste (ca. 1170 – 1253)
Caesarius Heisterbacensis (1180 – 1240)
Magna Carta (1215)
Franciscus Assisiensis (1182 – 1226)
Gregorius Magister (flor. 1226 – 1236)
Guido Faba (ca. 1190 – ca. 1245)
Albertanus Brixiensis (ca. 1190 – post 1250)
Thomas de Celano (ca. 1190 – 1260)
Carmina Burana (ca. 1230)
Fridericus II (1194 – 1274)
Iohannes de Garlandia (ca. 1195 – ca. 1272)
Vita Merlini (ca. 1240 ?)
Albertus Magnus (ca. 1195 – 1280)
Statuta communis Bugellae (1245)
Guillelmus Peraldus (floruit ante 1250)
Henricus de Bractonia (ca. 1210 – 1268)
Roger Bacon (1214 – 1294)
Bonaventura (1221 – 1274)
Thomas Aquinas (1224 – 1274)
Jacobus de Voragine (ca. 1230 – 1298)
Raimundus Lullus (1232 – 1315)
Iohannes de Capua (floruit 1263/78)
Liber Kalilae et Dimnae (ca. 1270)
Jacopone da Todi (1240 – 1306)
Gertrudis de Helfta (1256 – 1302)
Jacobus de Cessolis (floruit ca. 1280)
Vita Agnetis de Bohemia (ca. 1290/1310)
Lanfrancus Mediolanensis (floruit ca. 1295)

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Problematibus

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 24, 2006

ca. 1195 – 1280

Albertus Coloniensis cognomento Magnus, «Doctor universalis», «Vir in omni scientia adeo divinus ut nostri temporis stupor et miraculum congrue vocari possit» (Ulricus Strasburgensis), natus est circa annum 1195 Laugingae in Suevia. Anno 1223 monachus ordinis fratrum praedicatorum. Anno 1245 in S. Theologia doctor universitatis Parisiensis. Praeceptor amicusque fuit Thomae Aquinato. Episcopus Ratisbonensis anno 1260. Obiit «octogenarius et amplius» anno 1280 Coloniae Agrippinae. Albertus saepe dicebat: «Hoc scimus, quantum scimus, nam omnes parum scimus».

De XV Problematibus

D e q u i n d e c i m
p r o b l e m a t i b u s

P r o b l e m a t a :
I. Quod intellectus omnium hominum
est unus et idem numero.
II. Quod ista est falsa vel impropria:
homo intelligit.

III. Quod voluntas hominis
ex necessitate vult et eligit.

IV. Quod omnia quae in inferioribus aguntur,
subsunt necessitati corporum caelestium.

V. Quod mundus est aeternus.

VI. Quod numquam fuit primus homo.

VII. Quod anima, quae est forma hominis,
secundum quod homo,
corrumpitur corrupto corpore.

VIII. Quod anima post mortem separata
non patitur ab igne corporeo.

IX. Quod liberum arbitrium est
potentia passiva, non activa
et quod de necessitate movetur ab appetibili.

X. Quod deus non
cognoscit singularia.

XI. Quod non cognoscit
alia a se.

XII. Quod humani actus non
reguntur providentia dei.

XIII. Quod deus non potest dare
immortalitatem vel incorruptibilitatem
rei mortali vel corruptibili.

XIV. Quod corpus Christi iacens in sepulchro
et positum in cruce non est vel non fuit idem
numero simpliciter, sed secundum quid.

XV. Quod angelus et anima sunt simplices,
sed non absoluta simplicitate nec
per accessum ad compositionem,
sed tantum per recessum a summo simplici.

P r o b l e m a I
Quod intellectus omnium hominum
est unus et idem numero.
Contra primum: Intellectum hominis secundum naturam et substantiam et diffinitionem cognoscere possibile non est, nisi et natura intelligentiae et natura et substantia animae et diffinitio cognoscatur. Loquimur enim hic de cognitione, quae est per philosophiam, et non de ea quae est secundum fidem et secundum theologiam. Quae quamvis omnibus certior sit, tamen, quia a multis non capitur, ideo putatur difficultates velle evadere, qui ad theologiam se confert. Ideo ex intimis philosophiae rationes assumentes de natura intellectus loquentes de intellectu loquemur.
In philosophia igitur PERIPATETICORUM non nisi duas novas positiones invenimus a se valde differentes et unam antiquam, in qua non differunt PERIPATETICI, sed omnes uniformiter conveniunt. Illa vero in qua omnes conveniunt, positio est ANAXAGORAE, qui loquens de intellectu possibili dicit, quod intellectus possibilis est separatus et immixtus, simplicissimus, nulli nihil habens commune. Propter quod QUIDAM opinati sunt ipsum esse unum et eundem in omnibus et nullo determinatum ad unum proprie, quo ad alterum non determinetur. Si enim ad unum aliquod determinetur, ut dicunt, illo necessario differt ab alio. Hoc autem quo determinatur, constat, quod non est de natura intellectus, quae omnibus est communis. Aut ergo non determinatur aut alio quodam determinatur. Si autem non determinetur, habetur propositum, scilicet quod unus et idem est in omnibus. Si autem alio quodam determinatur quod non est de natura intellectus, hoc videbitur esse contra hypothesim, quia cum nihil determinetur per aliquid quod sibi non est secundum aliquem modum immixtum, sequitur, quod intellectus alicui immixtus sit, quod non congruit positioni.

****************

De XV problematibus

Hoc igitur omnium Peripateticorum antiqua est positio, secundum quod eam ALFARABIUS determinavit. Ex qua sequitur intellectum possibilem intelligibilium omnium esse speciem et non omnino potentiam esse materialem ad ipsa. Et quia ad philosophos loquimur, qui talibus perfecte debent esse instructi, his amplius non insistimus.

Post hos Graeci sapientes, PORPHYRIUS scilicet et EUSTRATIUS, ASPASIUS et MICHAEL EPHESIUS et quam plures alii venerunt praeter ALEXANDRUM, qui EPICURO consentit, qui omnes intellectum hominis intellectum possessum et non de natura intelligentiae existentem esse dixerunt. Et quem Graeci sapientes possessum, eundem ARABUM philosophi AVICENNA, AVERROES, ABUBACHER et quidam ALII adeptum esse dicebant, quia id quod possessum est, aliud est et alterius naturae a possidente. Dicunt enim, quod cum anima intellectualis hominis sit imago totius orbis et sola omnis orbis capax et forma organico corpori deputata per naturae convenientiam, necessarium est ipsam esse imaginem intelligentiae illius quae est decimi orbis. Qui orbis est sphaera activorum et passivorum, cuius intelligentiae instrumenta sunt calidum et frigidum, humidum et siccum, rarum et densum et alia quae in elementis inveniuntur, non quidem secundum se, sed secundum quod haec a virtutibus caelestibus mota informantur. Imago autem talis intelligentiae non omnino potest esse pura et simplex, sicut est natura intelligentiae primae et simplicis. Si enim talis esset, non esset forma organica primo et per se, quia natura intelligentiae simplicis non est organica. Anima autem de natura sua est organica, et ab ea habet corpus, quod ipsum est organicum. Et ideo dicit AVERROES, quod omnis diversitas, quae est in corpore, est a diversitate, quae est in forma, sicut diversitas organorum est a diversitate potentiarum et virium, quae sunt in anima. Si enim anima sine potentiis secundum seipsam diceretur et quod a diversitate organorum corporis esset diversitas potentiarum, sequeretur, quod ipsa secundum se posset quolibet uti organo, cum secundum seipsam non esset magis determinata ad unum quam ad aliud. Et sic sequeretur tectonica tibicines indui et cetera inconvenientia, quae contra Pythagoram concludit ARISTOTELES.
De XV problematibus

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Colonia de Albertos

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 23, 2006

Clonia

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Manifiesto Bobo

Posted by Canto Rodado on July 23, 2006

Un espectro ilumina el campus de la Universidad de los Andes, el espectro del Bobo. Contra esa luminaria se han conjurado todos los prejuicios de la racionalidad moderna, el escepticismo, el utilitarismo, el mercantilismo, el materialismo, el autobombo y el superyo.

No hay un solo desadaptado al que el espíritu de cuerpo no señale de Bobo, ni un solo outsider que no lance al rostro de las diferencias filosóficas más avanzadas, lo mismo que a los contradictores clásicos, la acusación estigmatizante de Bobo.

De este hecho se desprenden dos consecuencias:

La primera es que el Bobo se halla ya reconocido como una inteligencia por todas las facultades uniandinas.

La segunda, que es ya hora de que los bobos expresen a la luz del día y ante el mundo entero sus ideas, sus tendencias, sus aspiraciones, saliendo así al paso de esa leyenda del espectro bobo con un manifiesto de su pensamiento.

Con este fin se han congregado en Bogotá los representantes bobos de diferentes taras y redactado el siguiente Manifiesto, que aparecerá en lengua inglesa, francesa, alemana, italiana, flamenca y danesa.

Racionales e Intuitivos

Toda la historia de la sociedad humana, hasta la actualidad, es una historia de diferencia de puntos de vista.

Libres y esclavos, patricios y plebeyos, barones y siervos de la gleba, maestros y oficiales; en una palabra, vivos y bobos, frente a frente siempre, empeñados en una lucha ininterrumpida, velada unas veces, y otras franca y abierta, en una lucha que conduce en cada etapa a la transformación revolucionaria de todo el régimen mental o al exterminio de ambas miradas en conflicto.

En los tiempos históricos nos encontramos a la sociedad dividida casi por doquier en una serie de especialidades, dentro de cada una de los cuales reina, a su vez, una nueva jerarquía simbólica de grados y posiciones.

La moderna sociedad racionalista que se alza sobre las ruinas de la sociedad renascentista no ha abolido los antagonismos cosmogónicos. Lo que ha hecho ha sido crear nuevas divisiones, nuevas condiciones de exclusión, nuevas modalidades de competencia, que han venido a sustituir a las antiguas.

Sin embargo, nuestra época, la época de la ciencia moderna, se caracteriza por haber simplificado estos antagonismos de fe. Hoy, toda la sociedad tiende a separarse, cada vez más abiertamente, en dos grandes cascos polares: la racionalidad y el bobetariado.

De los magos medievales surgieron los “doctores” de las primeras universidades; y estos empíricos fueron el germen de donde brotaron los primeros filósofos de la naturaleza.

El descubrimiento de América y la circunnavegación de África, abrieron nuevos horizontes e imprimieron nuevo impulso a la racionalidad. El mercado de China y de las Indias orientales, la colonización de América, el intercambio con las colonias, la concentración de los medios de información y de la inteligencia en general, dieron al comercio, a la navegación, a la industria, un empuje jamás conocido, atizando con ello el elemento iluminante que se escondía en el seno de la sociedad oscura en descomposición.

 

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